Oh My Goth! Jasmine Giffen Joins the Personal Touch Career Services

In March 2018, the Personal Touch Career Services (PTCS) welcomed Jasmine Giffen to our team as our new Administrative Assistant and Marketing Coordinator.

Jasmine comes from a unique background, as a professional body piercer with seven years of experience for various shops in the Denver metro area. Throughout her career, she has managed the social media marketing and branding efforts for her own business.

At PTCS, Jasmine will be helping with marketing content, social media campaigns, customer service, and administrative functions.

In her free time, Jasmine enjoys working in many art mediums, including film photography, charcoal, and textile arts. She loves to read (high fantasy, horror, and poetry), partake in all things hockey, and collects cool rocks and oddities.

Welcome to the team!

Spring Cleaning for Your Job Search

job search spring cleaningWith the Spring Equinox later this week, many people are looking forward to the promise of spring and better weather. In this season of change and growth, nothing is more important than the annual spring cleaning – especially for your job search.

Spring cleaning involves taking a hard look at the corners that have gotten dusty from lack of use while sprucing up the tools you see every day.

Revitalize Your Resume

Does your resume look like it was written in the 80’s? If so, it is time to update that look and make sure the content is following the modern best practices.

Resumes are the ultimate “short attention span” documents. The latest statistics state that the HR recruiter or manager will only spend 6 seconds reading your resume before deciding if they want to invest real time into reading the content.

What are they looking for?

  • Relevant work experience and education
  • Targeted skills
  • Quantifiable achievements, results, or scope of responsibilities
  • A highly readable format

A modern resume needs to look good, read well, and above all, be relevant for the job you want. However, avoid the infographic style resume unless it is being sent directly to a human being. The visuals on a graphic resume will always make the online applications and screening computers choke.

Pass the Screening Computers

Regardless of how well written your resume is, chances are, you are going to be screened by a computer before it reaches a human being. Computers don’t care about the quality of the writing at all – they only react to key words. In fact, any resume needs a mix of both “Smart” and “Stupid key words.”

Smart key words relate to the actual job, such as “prospecting, negotiations, and account management” for a sales person. Stupid key words are those phrases that don’t really mean anything, like “excellent communication skills.” While we know this is boring writing, if HR is putting these phrases in the job description, it must be in the resume.

To successfully pass a screening computer, you must match 60-70% of the key words alone, and that includes both smart and stupid key words.

Update Your LinkedIn Profile

90% of employers will look at your LinkedIn profile before calling you in for an interview (source: LinkedIn, 2016). With that staggering statistic, you better be putting some thought into what you put online. Just copying and pasting your resume into your profile is not going to give employers the additional information they want.

Plus, key words on LinkedIn work differently than the resume. On LinkedIn, you want to have the high value key words sprinkled throughout your profile to drive recruiters to your page.

Review Your Job Search Website Settings

While relying solely on job sites like Indeed.com, ZipRecruiter.com, and CareerBuilder.com is not an effective job searching strategy, you don’t want to completely dismiss these leads for potential employers. Instead, make sure your automatic settings and job alerts are in order to forward the right kinds of opportunities to you.

In particular, check:

  • Your privacy settings. By posting your resume “Private” only, you will reduce the number of spam jobs and 100% commission sales jobs that you don’t want.
  • Your job alerts or automatic emails. Make sure you are getting notices for the jobs that meet your criteria.
  • To aid your sanity, only look at one job board a day, and then rotate them on a weekly basis. This will avoid seeing the same jobs over and over and will help you focus on the new opportunities when they appear.

Connect with Your Network

Part of managing your network is connecting with them on a regular basis. Spring is a great time to reach out to your contacts. The trick is to ask about them first before hitting them up with a pitch about your job search.

Follow Up on Past Job Leads

How long has it been since you followed up on an application or interview? How about researching companies for an opportunity in the hidden job market? If you aren’t sure, make it a best practice going forward to track all your activities and put follow-up activities in your calendar to make sure you don’t forget about a hot prospect.

Stop Doing Ineffective Job Search Tactics

The most important spring cleaning activities that most job seekers fail to do is review their strategies. What has yielded the most results? What has brought nothing but dead ends? What can be done to improve the numbers, such as reaching out to hiring managers directly?

It is said that one definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over while expecting different results. If what you are doing isn’t working, it’s time to mix it up.

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Want a see how your resume stacks up to the competition? Visit my website to schedule a free resume review: https://personaltouchcareerservices.com/contact

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New 30-Minute Coaching Sessions

Do you know how to manage your job search?

Have you found yourself wondering how well your job search stacks up to the competition? Want to gain an expert’s opinion of your current practices and suggest real, tangible strategies to improve your success rates? Want to gain an in-depth evaluation of your resume and LinkedIn profiles? Our new 30-Minute Coaching sessions could be just the trick.

 

During your phone or online session, we will address your specific questions about the job search, such as resumes, job search strategies, or interviews. We also evaluate your current tactics to make sure that you are using best practices for searching online, building your LinkedIn network, and dealing with recruiters. Afterwards, you will receive specific strategies to improve your job search overall.

 

If you want to pinpoint the best ways to improve your job search in a cost-effective manner, our 30-Minute Coaching sessions are for you.

Click here to sign up

Click here to sign up!

What’s Wrong with My Resume? Word Creep, Google Docs Blowout, Bad Apples, and the Mobile Job Search

Surprise! Your resume may not look like your resume.

There is a conspiracy working against you for your job search: your resume and other documents will not look the same from one computer to another. Even if you send the Word document from one PC to another that also has Microsoft Office, you may become the victim of “Word Creep.” As 40% of job seekers now conduct their job search through their mobile devices, the prevalence of Word Creep has only gotten worse.

What is happening here?

 

What is “Word Creep?”

Have you ever spent tons of time making sure that your resume fits perfectly on one or two pages, just to email it to someone and have them ask, “Why is there one sentence at the top of the last page?  Couldn’t you format it correctly?”

Congratulations, you are the victim of Word Creep.

Basically, any shift in formatting from one computer to another is Word Creep in action. While some of the classic Creeps were caused from sending a document written on a PC computer to a Mac, this is not terribly uncommon going from one PC to another. Today, we have further formatting shifts that are caused by uploading your perfectly formatted resume onto Google Docs to use in your mobile job search.

 

Google Doc Blowouts

While Google Docs will tell you that your uploaded resume is still a Word document, many of the advanced formatting features available in Word have been disabled or reinterpreted. Plus, if you need to edit it or change it from your Google Drive, it needs to convert the Word document into a Google Doc. This is where the formatting gets especially funky. In particular, the line spacing on the page is the first thing to lose its alignment.

When downloading the Google Doc as a Word document, the formatting is likely to flip again. In some cases, it will revert to the original line spacing, HOWEVER, that is not what you saw in the online version of the Google Doc.

 

Bad Apples

Going from PC to Mac environments has been the bane of job seekers for a multitude of years. In particular, Microsoft’s Word documents are not compatible with Mac’s Pages documents. There are ways for someone to view a Pages document on a PC, but it involves multiple conversions including making a ZIP file. Let’s be honest: most of the time, HR is not going to do the extra steps to convert that Pages document into their required formats. And yes, the vast majority of businesses rely upon Microsoft Office, even on their Mac computers.

However, a new problem is on the rise: mobile platforms.

It is possible to create a resume on a tablet, either from a Word app or even the Office online product. The problem is that the formatting is difficult to adjust and some of the features are more difficult to access. Plus, the possibility of Word Creep increases exponentially, especially if the job seeker is using an iPad and sending to a PC.

 

Making the Most of The Mobile Job Search

The easiest solution for making your resume readable while using your phone or tablet to job search is to always send it as a PDF. Most employers have evolved their Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) to accept PDFs.

LinkedIn can fill the gap as well, as some of the more cutting-edge companies are letting applicants apply with their LinkedIn profile directly into their own ATS.

Whatever platform you use, it is still best to create the resume in Word on a computer and then convert it to PDF to limit the amount of formatting errors you will encounter. Even PDFs are driven by the original document’s code, such as setting up columns or tables. Then load that PDF onto your mobile devices, making it ready-to-go at a moment’s notice.

 

Last Tip: Check Your Formatting

Since some ATS systems will drop your resume into a text form of the document, it is good to know how that looks to HR. One of the best – and cheapest – tests for this is Indeed.com. Just upload your resume onto the website and take a look at the preview. This gives you an idea of how HR will see your document.

Not pretty, but effective. Especially if you took the time to concentrate on what really matters most: the quality of the writing and the inclusion of the relevant key words.

 

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Want a see how your resume stacks up to the competition? Visit my website to schedule a free resume review: https://personaltouchcareerservices.com/contact

Job Searching And Hiring Trends For 2018

2018's job searching and hiring trends

2018’s job searching and hiring trends

If you are like many people, January is the time to renew your job search and find a new position that you love. Fortunately, employers are revamping their recruitment efforts as well as they seek talent for their team. However, are you up-to-date with their latest trends, tricks, and methods?

  1. LinkedIn is more important than ever

With over 450 million members, it is estimated that 1 in every 3 professionals on the planet have a LinkedIn profile (source: LinkedIn). For this reason, approximately 90% of employers will look at your LinkedIn profile before calling you for an interview – regardless of where they posted the position. In fact, many employers let candidates apply with their LinkedIn profile directly on their website.

If you are serious about your job search, you need a dynamic, key word rich LinkedIn profile that also highlights who you are as a person. One reason why LinkedIn is popular is because it gives additional insight beyond just the resume.

  1. Pictures matter

LinkedIn is a visual media, and that includes your profile picture, background, and any images that you use. You don’t want to subject yourself to unintended ageism. If you are a more mature worker, make sure that you use a high-quality photo that doesn’t make you look tired or washed out because of poor lighting.  Need some photography tips? Check out the website www.PhotoFeeler.com for excellent advice and crowdsourced opinions on your profile pictures.

  1. The rise of mobile job searching

More than ever, job seekers are using their smart phones and tablets for their job search. As a response, many companies have made their application process more mobile responsive. Some apps, like the LinkedIn Job Search App, can be more intuitive than using the website. Other job searching sites like Indeed.com, Monster.com and Glassdoor.com’s Job Search have all developed apps for their platforms.

BIG TIP: even if you are using a mobile app, set up your account on the website first. This will often reveal options that are harder or impossible to access from the app. Plus, it is easier to see any typos or mistakes that may have been made when establishing your account’s profile.

  1. Cover letters are on the decline

According to a survey of Denver area HR professionals that my company, the Personal Touch Career Services, conducted in October 2017, only 50% of them felt that cover letters were a valuable part of the application process. In fact, 40% of corporate recruiters either don’t read them or don’t even allow the cover letters to be uploaded into their Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) databases. Of the remaining 10%, they just use them as a test to see if people will submit everything that was requested in the job posting.

  1. HR likes professional associations

While many Gen Ys and other young professionals avoid professional associations for their specific career interests, HR still finds them to be viable places to source candidates. According to our survey, professional associations ranked 3rd in the preferred venues to find candidates, behind Indeed.com and their own company websites (respectively.) Getting involved in an association offers more value to recruiters than just being a footnote on the resume.

  1. Hiring managers are still open to direct contact from job seekers

Many hiring managers can be just as frustrated with the job search as the candidates. HR processes can be slow and the focus on key word screening can accidentally screen out top candidates. For these reasons, managers are generally open to receiving resumes, especially when the candidate does his or her research to target their specific company and challenges. Fortunately, social sites like LinkedIn and data scrappers like www.Hunter.io make it easier than ever for job seekers to find and contact hiring managers.

  1. Low unemployment does not mean your job search will be easy

While many industries are desperately seeking employees – including healthcare, hospitality, and warehouse roles – in-demand careers still require a dedicated effort on the job seeker’s part. Any candidate who puts in the extra effort to contact managers while dealing with HR’s tricks and traps is more likely to land a quality job – but it does take that extra effort to stand out from the crowd.

Good luck with your job search!

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Ask Donna: How can I keep my job search alive during the holidays?

Dear Donna,

I’ve noticed that the amount of jobs posted online seems to dry up around the holiday season – I know I saw a definite drop in relevant jobs for me over Thanksgiving week. I’m worried that I won’t be able to keep my job search alive during the pending holidays. How can I make the most of this slow time of the year?

– Not a Happy Elf

 

Dear Elf:

First of all, the job boards and employment sites like Indeed should not be the number one focus of your job search no matter what time of year it is. While these are helpful for generating leads, they are just one piece of your entire job search strategy. It is true that many employers hold off on posting jobs until January, however, this doesn’t mean that your job search needs to go dormant. Instead, you should be focusing on the other, more valuable aspects of your job search.

Here’s a great checklist to make sure you don’t lose traction for the rest of December…

  1. Update your resume, LinkedIn, and cover letters

Now is the perfect time to update your materials. Styles and tactics change over time, so if you are still using an old resume, be sure to look at it with fresh eyes. Look at more than just the format and appearance. You want to make sure you are pulling the top key words for your profession, based on current job postings.

Did you know that 90% of employers are looking at your LinkedIn profile? Yep. [Source: LinkedIn, 2016.] For this reason alone, make sure you are following the current best practices to optimize your profile and drive more recruiters to it.

When was the last time you reviewed your cover letters? While only 50% of HR departments value the cover letter itself [source: Mile High SHRM survey from Personal Touch Career Services, 2017], it is still a valuable component to your job search. Make sure it is well written and appropriate for your target jobs.

  1. Get involved on LinkedIn

Now that you updated your profile, so what? If nobody knows who you are, they have no reason to reach out to you. You need to build your reputation within your industry.

This can be done two ways: sharing or writing quality content and getting involved in the Groups.

First, if you are a great writer, start publishing articles or blogs on LinkedIn. If you aren’t, you can simply share other relevant articles that you find. Don’t worry – it’s not copyright infringement, as the links always go back to the original article. These can be shared both in your newsfeed and in your Groups.

Speaking of the Groups, when was the last time you got involved in the discussions in your top Groups? This is another way to build your reputation and become associated with helpful opinions on relevant topics for your industry.

  1. Take classes to fill in your knowledge gaps

Are you wondering how to do those steps for your LinkedIn account? Are you missing a vital skill for your target jobs? Now is the perfect time to take a quick class to fill in those gaps and make you a more valuable employee.

I highly recommend checking out www.Udemy.com or other online learning sites. These websites feature literally hundreds of thousands of courses that are self-paced, video-intensive, and subject-specific. To give you an idea of what you can learn, check out my LinkedIn class, “Using LinkedIn to Get a Job Without Going Crazy” https://www.udemy.com/using-linkedin-to-get-a-job/?couponCode=FLYER75

Explore the additional classes offered – everything from Microsoft Word to learning Italian – and focus on those courses that boost your value to the employers.

  1. Get in touch with your current network

The holidays are an ideal time to tap your network on the shoulder and let them know two critical things: one, that you appreciate them; and two, that you are still looking for a position. Notice that the gratitude piece must come first. No one wants to be pumped for job leads in a Christmas card, but taking the time to share a heartfelt note about how you value them can breed more goodwill.

  1. Start researching potential employers in the hidden job market

Believe it or not, jobs posted online on sites like Indeed and LinkedIn only make up a fraction of the available positions. Many are only listed on the company’s website. Not only that, some aren’t listed at all, at least not until the company already has a candidate in mind. Collectively, this is known as the hidden job market.

The secret to landing a hidden job is first and foremost paying attention to what is going on in your industry and local market. Start by picking out some companies that have caught your interest, whether they have a job opening or not. Then conduct systematic research to identify their needs, challenges, key decision makers, and standings in the market. Track them with Google Alerts to see the latest news – often times, a relevant news article can be turned into an excuse to reach out to managers and offer your services as a potential employee.

  1. Implement structured networking

Chances are that you have heard the rumor: up to 80% of jobs are found by networking. This is true to some extent, as networking includes everything from contacting a hiring manager for a posted job to Aunt Martha saw a job on Indeed and forwarded it to you.

Structured networking is similar to researching potential employers in the hidden job market, but instead of hunting companies, you want to identify people. Don’t look at just the key managers. Look for potential co-workers or contractors that can tell you more about the company and their culture. Thanks to such tools as LinkedIn, conducting structured networking is easier than ever before, once you learn the tricks.

  1. Spread some joy

Most of all, take some time for yourself this holiday season. Enjoy time with your family and friends. Eat that cookie and drink some egg nog. Along the way, reflect on all the positive things that happened this year and be grateful, no matter how small. After all, a light heart is very attractive – especially to employers.

And have a cool Yule!

Donna Shannon

 

Got a question for Donna? Just email your question to april@personaltouchcareerservices.com

Want a see how your resume and LinkedIn profile stacks up to the competition? Visit my website to schedule a free resume review: https://personaltouchcareerservices.com/contact

HR responds: Are cover letters obsolete?

 

It’s no secret that hiring standards change over time. One of the latest trends is the attitude that HR has towards cover letters. What used to be a requirement is often not even requested anymore.

Recently, the Personal Touch Career Services surveyed the members of the Mile High SHRM (Society for Human Resources Management) to see what HR really thinks of cover letters.

The answers were very insightful…

Split Responses

Interesting enough, the survey respondents were split 50/50 on the cover letter issue. 50% felt that a well-written cover letter can improve a candidate’s chances with their company. However, the other 50% didn’t even ask for them or only looked at it as screening criteria… basically, those who didn’t send in a letter were screened out, but HR didn’t care about the content.

The rise of the LinkedIn profile

While HR recruiters may not actually care about your cover letter, many require that candidates send in the letter just to show their level of professionalism. Instead, many companies are migrating to using LinkedIn over the traditional cover letter. This is why 90% of employers are looking at your profile.

One of the purposes of a cover letter is to customize it to the specific job, capturing more relevant key words and highlight your top achievements. Yet more employers are defaulting to reviewing the LinkedIn profile for this additional information. In our same survey, corporate recruiters are checking the completeness of the profile, followed by the number of Skills and Endorsements:

 

Not only that, but your number of Recommendations and the consistency between your resume and the LinkedIn profile are paramount. While the LinkedIn profile doesn’t need to be a word-for-word recreation of the resume, it does need the facts to be consistent, such as job titles, employers, dates, and education.

So, why are they looking at Skills and Recommendations? To compare your expertise to their needs while seeing what others have to say about you.

Cover letters are not dead…yet

While it is tempting to cast aside the traditional cover letter in favor of a comprehensive LinkedIn profile, keep in mind that 50% of the employers still find them valuable. The kicker is that a stale, boring repetition of your resume is not going to do the trick. HR – and hiring managers – want to see a well-written cover letter that highlights your strengths while explaining what you can do to help them. After all, if you can prove that you can help the company make money, save money or solve problems, your chances for an interview increase exponentially.

Did you enjoy this article? Please join my newsletter to receive all the latest news, views, and job searching tips: http://eepurl.com/bgVrJr.

 

Want a see how your cover letter and LinkedIn profile stack up to the competition? Visit my website to schedule a free consultation:  

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How to start building an effective job search strategy

Job Strategy

Do you have a real job search strategy? Or are you spending most of your time scanning the job websites like Indeed.com and ZipRecruiter.com daily, hoping they find your dream job and by some miracle get past the HR screening process? On the flip side, you probably have heard the advice that networking is crucial to your job search. But do you know how to do it effectively?

Overall, an effective job search strategy breaks down the daunting task of finding a job into tactical, actionable steps that open additional opportunities while making the most of every job posting. From successfully navigating the HR maze to tracking down the hiring manager, a real job search plan will save you from wasting time and opportunities.

  1. Understand how HR works

Human Resources is not your buddy in the job search. In fact, they don’t hire anyone – it is their job to CUT candidates. To do this, every single company has processes to quickly weed out candidates. Some of their favorite tricks include specific application instructions, harping on grammatical and spelling errors, and using key word driven application systems.

In a nutshell, surviving the screening process is a game. To win, you need to know the rules.

So, why is this important? You still must apply to legally be considered for a job. Once that application is sent, the real work begins…

  1. Track down the hiring managers

Believe it or not, hiring managers are just as frustrated with the HR as the candidates. HR doesn’t always deliver the most qualified candidates – they are just the ones who played the game the best. Do the managers a favor and send them your resume directly.

Managers can be found through LinkedIn, the company’s website, local business journal databases, and comprehensive online prospecting tools such as ZoomInfo.com or AeroLeads: https://aeroleads.com/ . Many newer apps or Google extensions, such as Hunter https://hunter.io/ or Viola Norbert https://www.voilanorbert.com/ offer free options to nail those elusive contact details, such as email addresses.

For a more thorough list of these prospecting sites, please email me at:  donna@personaltouchcareerservices.com .

  1. Develop a networking strategy

For some, “networking” is a daunting word. Before assuming that you must go to massive after-hours events and shake a bunch of hands, realize that a networking strategy is a multi-faceted approach to cultivating existing contacts while making new ones. This includes face-to-face meetings as well as social media.

First, identify your current contacts. Find former colleagues, clients, and vendors on LinkedIn to start expanding that base.

Second, develop tools to reach out to new people. Join Groups on LinkedIn and get involved, while inviting thought leaders in those Groups to connect with you. Research your target companies and contact potential co-workers, managers, and even past employees to learn more about those organizations.

Finally, don’t forget face-to-face options. Personally, I make quality connections through professional associations, www.Meetup.com groups, and even social gatherings.

  1. Create automated tools

Create specific job search alerts from your favorite job searching sites. Along those lines, get rid of the junk. Always make sure that your resume is posted as “private.” This will greatly reduce the amount of spam, scams, and 100% commission jobs that are famous for contacting every single public resume on the site.

Finally, set up Google Alerts https://www.google.com/alerts on your top target companies. One of the best ways to source a hidden job is to identify a major change at a company and reach out to a hiring manager whether there is a job posting or not. Create a custom pitch that convinces them you can really help improve their bottom line.

  1. Make time to make it happen

Job searching does take time. If all you are doing is casually looking at job online, you are wishing, not working for it. Set aside consistent days and times to work on the job search.

Additionally, take note of the distractions and blocks to your job search. Life does happen, after all. Set your priorities while realizing that you may need to put in some hours after the kids go to bed to really work on your job search.

  1. Track your progress

If you don’t write something down, it didn’t happen. Track every single application, contact, messages, and outcomes. Not only is this important for following up, it helps with seeing how effective your job search is.

Our goal is to get 1-2 phone interviews for every 10 applications submitted. If you aren’t tracking your results, how will you know if you are being effective?

 

Did you enjoy this article? Please join my newsletter to receive all the latest news, views, and job searching tips: http://eepurl.com/bgVrJr.

 

Want a see how your cover letter and LinkedIn profile stack up to the competition? Visit my website to schedule a free consultation:  

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Is your resume a monster?

Does your resume look like a zombie, using old, outdated tactics that died 10 years ago? Or is it like a mummy: dry, lifeless, and stale? Or is a hulking beast, weighed down with too much information? Is it a weird conglomeration of different styles, making it look like Frankenstein’s monster?

Check out these horrifying errors and learn what you can do to breathe new life into your resume:

1. The Zombie Resume
Like old corpses digging their way out of the grave, a zombie resume tries to resurrect old, ineffective strategies that may have been great 20 years ago but don’t really work that well in the modern world. These errors are usually in format, including the visual appearance and the key sections.
The biggest format offender is the “classic” two-column approach, where the section headings are listed on the left and the content is on the right. While it can still be appealing when used correctly, the problem is the WAY that this document is formatted. If you use the template straight out of Microsoft Word, many are built with tables or text boxes. However, computers don’t read these like humans. They process the first column DOWN, then move on to the next column and read that down. The final effect is that the headings are completely divorced from the content.
Have you ever heard that your resume should be “one page only?” That’s another classic zombie resume. Unless you are seeking an entry level job, this tactic died years ago. There is simply no way for an experienced job seeker to layer in enough key words to survive the screening and capture key achievements to impress hiring managers within one page.

Ways to improve:
First of all, understand how different computers and systems will interpret your resume. It is possible to create a visually-appealing resume that still uploads smoothly into an online application. Another option is to save your documents as PDFs, especially when emailing your resume. That way, you know what you sent will appear the same way on the other side.

2. The Mummy Resume
For a mummy, the writing itself is dry, boring, and lifeless. Whether this is a lack of clear achievements or simply repeating such deadly phrases as “responsible for,” these are the things that both recruiters and hiring managers hate to read.
A classic mummy strategy is the Objective Statement. Ever feel like these are boring, generalized statements that could apply to almost any job? That’s because they are. HR hates objective statements because they are vague. Who wouldn’t want “a stable job with a dynamic company that has plenty of opportunity for growth?” On the flip side, sometimes Objective Statements are extremely specific, such as “To become the Production Manager at ABC Company.” In that case, if you miss out on the targeted job, you won’t be considered for anything else.

Ways to improve:
While sometimes we need to use antiquated phrases such as “excellent communication skills” to increase our key word count, your entire resume should not read like the job description. Make it a balance of key words, top responsibilities, and achievements. Plus, let your personality come through in the summary.
Struggling with achievements? Think in terms of top metrics. It’s one thing to say, “led a development team,” but it is much more impressive and informative to write “led a team of 12 developers that produced 3 new CPG products within 3 years.”
Kill the Objective Statement. Instead, write a solid, engaging summary that tells the employers why you are the best candidate for the job.
Bonus points: modernize your contact information. Include your LinkedIn profile and only list your city and state for your location.

3. The Hulking Beast Resume
Has your resume grown to unbelievable proportions, with every new job adding what feels like miles of content? While this can happen to anyone with a long career, some industries such as IT are more susceptible to adding massive bulk.
While spreading out onto three pages is an obvious sign of a beastly resume, the writing itself can be the problem. It is tempting to write in run-on sentences or highly detailed bullets.
Ways to improve:

GET TO THE POINT. Resumes are not the formal, stuffy documents that they were 15 years ago. Read it out loud. If you must take a breath before coming to the end of a sentence, it is too long. You need to either break it into multiple sentences or trim it back significantly.
Not sure what to keep? Read the job description. If your skills, duties, achievements, education, and anything else on your resume doesn’t relate to the job, it is hurting your chances.

4. Frankenstein’s Monster Resume
WAAAAY back in the day, we did things like different fonts, different styles, and other formatting tricks to help guide the eyes. However, modern resumes should be more consistent in their look and feel.
This goes double for the writing style itself. Nothing reflects more poorly on a resume than two distinct writing styles within one document. It can be switching the tenses from first person to third, or being inconsistent with present and past tense. Similarly, if someone else wrote your original resume, you need to either match the writing style yourself or pay a professional to make sure that the tone is the same throughout the document.
Ways to improve:
Pick one font and stick with it. Make sure your voice is consistent throughout the document, especially when drafting your achievements. A pop of color can be effective, but make sure that the colors complement each other and don’t distract from your overall message.

Want a see how your resume stacks up to the competition? Visit my website to schedule a free resume review: http://personaltouchcareerservices.com/contact

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